Colbolt

Colbolt is four times harder than platinum but is less dense. It is scratch resistant and chip resistant, as well as hypoallergenic.

Diamond 101

Many people believe diamonds to be unbreakable. While they are extremely strong (with a hardness of 10) they are also brittle and can chip or crack under certain conditions.Diamonds are available in a wide variety of qualities. At The Gem Smith, we typically stock a clarity of SI1 and above, and a color of D to I. This is a higher quality than you will find at many wider known jewelry locations, especially for the smaller stones. Some jeweler’s feel they don’t matter as much, we think they do. Many times our diamonds are still very reasonably priced compared to a diamond of the same size but lesser quality at many other jewelers. If you are looking for a different quality, let us know and we will gladly order a few in for you to look at.

Chalcedony

With a hardness of 6.5-7, blue and lavender Chalcedony is rated “fair” for everyday wear. Avoid exposure to heat, contact with chemicals, and protect from scratches and harsh blows. To clean, gently scrub with a soft toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and warm water, or clean in an at-home ultrasonic unit.

The 4 C’s of Diamonds

 

Cut:

The cut of a diamond is referring to how light is returned due to a

diamonds facets. It is responsible for brilliance, fire, and scintillation.

Brilliance is the combination of all the white light reflected from the

surface and the inside of a diamond.

Fire refers to the flashes of color you see in a diamond.

Scintillation are flashes of the light seen when the wearer moves or

color shifts.

Color:

The color of a diamond is determined by using the GIA® d-to- z color

grading system which is the most widely accepted for grading.

Diamonds are evaluated based on the absence of color. So no hue

equals a higher value.

Clarity:

A diamonds clarity is graded on the absence of inclusions and

blemishes. Inclusions are internal characteristics and blemishes are

external characteristics.

Fl/IF: Flawless, there are no internal or external flaws.

VVS1/VVS2: Very, Very slightly included. Inclusions not visible to the

eye and are difficult to see even under 10x magnification.

VS1/VS1: Very, slightly included. Inclusions are typically not visible to

the naked eye.

SI1/SI2: Slightly included. Inclusions are visible under 10x

magnification and may be visible to the naked eye.

I1/I2/I3: Included. Inclusions are visible to the naked eye.

Carat Weight:

Carat weight also links to the price of the diamond. This is because

the supply is low and the demand is high.

Diamonds of equal carat weight are not always the same size.

Different proportions and depths will result in different size and

weight combinations.

Morganite

With a hardness of 7.5 to 8, morganite is rated “good’ for everyday wear. Avoid exposure to heat, contact with chemicals, and protect from scratches and harsh blows. To clean, gently scrub with a soft toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and warm water.

Colored light to medium light pink, moganite was discovered in Madagascar in the early 1900’s.

How To Choose A Diamond

First you need to decide on a carat weight or price range. The next thing we recommend looking at is the cut. If the cut is off, the diamond will not sparkle right. Next we go to color. A lower color will result in the diamond beginning to look yellow. And last, but still important, we look at clarity so long as the diamond has a clarity of I1 and above. If it is below the I1 clarity, the order we prefer in choosing the diamond will be different.

Lab Grown

Lab grown diamonds have the same properties as natural diamonds. They are chemically, physically, and optically identical to natural diamonds. They are not fake or simulants.

Benefits:

  • Price: Lab-grown diamonds are generally between 15-30% less than anatural diamond.
  • Conflict Free: Worries about the political and ethical dimensions of mining operations can be put to rest.
  • Environmentally Friendly: For those who may be concerned about the environmental impact of natural diamonds, lab grown diamonds can be a great alternative.
  • Sustainability: Lab grown diamonds are made by man from carbon dioxide and therefore, their cultivation does not deplete a finite resource.

Enhanced Diamonds

Also known as fracture filling or clarity enhanced diamonds, enhanced diamonds are diamonds that are imperfect (usually I1, I2, or I3) and have been treated to improve color or clarity by laser drilling or fracture filling. Care needs to be taken when being worn and when being worked on as the filling can come out in different environments. The process of enhancing a diamond uses a glass like material containing bismuth. It adds very little, if any, weight to the diamond. The enhancement improves the diamond 1-2 grades by masking the features visible to the naked eye. Enhancements can improve the beauty but not the quality. Enhanced diamonds can be detected by the trained eye due to a “flash-effect” that any enhanced diamond will have. *Unless specifically asked for The Gem Smith does not stock or sell this type of diamond.

Diamonds Vs. Lab Grown Vs. Cz's Vs. Moissanite

Both natural diamonds and Lab Grown diamonds are real diamonds. The difference being, lab grown are grown in a lab while natural diamonds are formed in the earth. They are chemically and optically identical to each other.

Lab grown diamonds are created in a controlled environment. This environment reproduces the earth’s conditions when growing a natural diamond. This results in the chemical and physical properties

being identical to the ones grown naturally. Unless a lab grown diamond has an engraving on it stating that it is lab grown, even a trained eye will be unable to tell the difference between a lab grown diamond and a natural diamond.

Lab grown diamonds are however very different in price. They are usually about 30% less than a natural diamond of the same size and quality.

There is a big difference between diamonds (both natural and lab grown) and a CZ (cubic zirconia) or a Moissanite.

A CZ does not have the same chemical makeup as a diamond, and under a trained eye the difference is obvious. This is a man-made, very inexpensive alternative to a diamond and is meant to mimic a diamonds look and feel as closely as possible.

A Moissanite is a stone of its own. The chemical makeup is not the same as a diamond or a CZ. Moissanite has its own chemical makeup and was first discovered in a crater in Arizona in 1893, and since then they have been lab grown.

alexandrite

With a hardness of 8.5, alexandrite is rated “excellent” for everyday wear. To clean, gently scrub with a soft toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and warm water.

More expensive than diamonds, an alexandrite’s color shifts depending on the light around it. It changes between a noble green and a deep red. Color intensity and amount of change also depends on the quality of the stone.

Amethyst

With a hardness of 7, amethyst is rated “good” for everyday wear. Avoid direct sunlight and exposure to heat which may cause color to fade. Avoid contact with chemicals. To clean, gently scrub with a soft toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and warm water, or clean in an at-home ultrasonic unit.

Amethyst can range from light purple to deep purple

Ametrine

With a hardness of 7, ametrine is rated “good” for everyday wear. Avoid direct sunlight and exposure to heat which may cause color to fade. Avoid contact with chemicals. To clean, gently scrub with a soft toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and warm water, or clean in an at-home ultrasonic unit.

Ametrine is a blend of amethyst and citrine. It is almost exclusively mined from a mine deep in the lowlands of Bolivia.

Colors range from a light to medium purple mixed with a light to medium golden yellow.

Aquamarine

With a hardness between 7.5 and 8, aquamarine is rated “good” for everyday wear. Avoid exposure to heat, contact with chemicals, and protect from scratches and harsh blows. To clean, gently scrub with a soft toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and warm water.

Aquamarine is a close “cousin” to stones such as emerald and morganite. It was believed to promote youthful vitality, health, and mental clarity.

Carnelian

Thought to promote bravery, improve public speaking and protect the wearer from envy, this smooth red stone was prized across the ancient world as well as Egypt where they show up as amulets and funeral scarabs.

With a hardness of 6.5-7 Carnelian is rated “fair” for everyday wear. Avoid exposure to heat, contact with chemicals, and protect from scratches and harsh blows. To clean, gently scrub with a soft toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and warm water, or clean in an at-home ultrasonic unit.

Chrysoprase

Chrysoprase is rated “fair” for everyday wear. Avoid exposure to heat, contact with chemicals, and protect from scratches and harsh blows. To clean, gently scrub with a soft toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and warm water, or clean in an at-home ultrasonic unit.

Chrysoprase is part of the chalcedony family and is the most sought after. Its name comes from the Greek word meaning “gold-green.”

Citrine

With a hardness of 7, citrine is rated “good” for everyday wear. Avoid direct sunlight and exposure to heat which may cause color to fade. Avoid contact with chemicals. To clean, gently scrub with a soft toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and warm water, or clean in an at-home ultrasonic unit.

Citrine takes its name from the French word “citron” or lemon. It is a golden yellow quartz. It is extremely rare in nature, and most are created by heating amethyst. Color ranges from a light, slightly golden color to a medium dark golden yellow.

Coral

With a hardness between 3.5 to 4, Coral is not recommended for everyday wear, and one should take care when wearing. Avoid exposure to heat, contact with chemicals, and protect from scratches and harsh blows. To clean, wipe gently with a moist cloth.

Color ranges from a light to medium salmon, to a medium to dark orange red.

Ancient Romans and Persians used Coral to cure madness and impart wisdom.

Cubic Zirconia

Cubic Zirconia is the cubic crystalline form of zirconium dioxide. The synthesized material is hard and optically flawless. It is usually colorless, but is also made in a variety of colors. Cubic Zirconia shouldn’t be confused with zircon, which is its own unique stone.

Emerald

With a hardness of 7.5 to 8, Emerald is rated “fair to good” for everyday wear with care. Avoid exposure to heat, contact with chemicals, and protect from scratches and harsh blows. To clean, gently scrub with a soft toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and warm water.

The light to medium green color of the emerald was often believed to bring luck and health. It is also representative of life and springtime.

Garnet

With a hardness between 7 and 7.5, Garnet is rated “good” for everyday wear. Avoid exposure to heat and sudden changes in temperature. To clean, gently scrub with a soft toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and warm water, or clean in an at-home ultrasonic unit.

The most common garnet is known as a medium to dark red to orange brown. This is the garnet that is associated with January’s birthstone, and is less known as Mozambique Garnet.

A Rhodolite Garnet ranges in color from a medium to dark, raspberry plum color. Tinged by varying shades of purple and pink, the word rhodolite derives from a Greek word meaning “rose” or “rose colored.”

A Spessarite Garnet (sometimes called Mandarine Garnet) has a medium yellow/orange variation complementing citrine or golden topaz. Like other garnets, It is believed by some to alleviate depression and blood-related sickness.

A Tsavorite Garnet ranges from a light to medium yellowish green to a medium dark very slightly yellowish green. Is it named for the Tsavo National Park at the border of Kenya and Tanzania, where it was discovered.

Lolite

With a hardness between 7 and 7.5, Iolite is rated “fair” for everyday wear with care. Avoid exposure to heat, contact with chemicals, and protect from scratches and harsh blows. To clean, gently scrub with a soft toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and warm water.

From the Greek word ios, meaning violet, iolite acts as a natural polarizer. The Vikings used it to accurately scan the water on hazy days, just like fishermen use polarized sunglasses today.

Color ranges from a medium light to dark grayish purple, grape color.

Jade

With a hardness between 6 and 7, Jade is rated “fair” for everyday wear with care. Avoid exposure to heat, contact with chemicals, and protect from scratches and harsh blows. To clean, gently scrub with a soft toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and warm water, or clean in an at-home ultrasonic unit.

Lapis

Lapis is rated “fair” for everyday wear with care. Avoid exposure to heat, contact with chemicals, and protect from scratches and harsh blows. To clean, gently scrub with a soft toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and warm water.

Color ranges from a medium to dark blue with some gold flakes of pyrite.

Moissanite

Moissanite was discovered in 1893 by Henri Moissan, a French Scientist. It was discovered in Arizona in a crater that was created by a meteorite. He first believed that what he had discovered was diamonds. Later it was determined the crystals were composed of silicon carbide.

Natural Moissanite is very rare. The majority available today is lab- created, meaning the properties and chemical makeup are all the same it is just created in a lab.

Marcasite

With a hardness of 6 to 6.5, Marcasite is rated “fair” for everyday wear. Avoid exposure to heat, contact with chemicals, and protect from scratches and harsh blows. To clean, gently scrub with a soft toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and warm water. Typically the surface will oxidize over time. To clean, gently scrub with a soft toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and warm water.

Moonstone

With a hardness of 6-6.5, moonstone is rated “good” for everyday wear. Avoid exposure to heat, contact with chemicals, and protect from scratches and harsh blows. To clean, gently scrub with a soft toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and warm water.

Moonstone is a milky, transparent to opaque color with a medium dome.

Onyx

With a hardness of 6.5 to 7, Onyx is rated “fair” for everyday wear. Avoid exposure to heat, contact with chemicals, and protect from scratches and harsh blows. To clean, gently scrub with a soft toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and warm water, or clean in an at-home ultrasonic unit.

Onyx was once thought to enhance confidence and authority and to guard the heart from romantic obsession.

Opal

With a hardness of 5 to 6.5, Opal is rated “fair” for everyday wear. Take care when wearing opal. Avoid exposure to heat, contact with chemicals, and protect from scratches and harsh blows. To clean, gently scrub with a soft toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and warm water.

Opal is the birthstone for October and was once thought to include the colors of all precious stones. Opals possess uncanny powers for a variety of cultures, such as a hypnotic talisman or instilling invisibility in powdered form.

Mexican Fire Opal

With a hardness of 5 to 6.5 it is important to take care when wearing Mexican Fire Opal. Avoid exposure to heat, contact with chemicals, and protect from scratches and harsh blows. To clean, gently scrub with a soft toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and warm water.

Color ranges from a striking dark orange to a brilliant cherry red. It is the national stone of Mexico.

Pearl

With a hardness between 2.5 and 4, Pearls are not recommended for everyday wear, and one should take care when wearing. Avoid exposure to heat and protect from scratches and harsh blows. Avoid contact with chemicals, especially perfumes, perspiration and hair sprays. To clean, wipe gently with a moist cloth.

South Sea Cultured Pearls are long treasured as the most desirable pearls on the planet. They are the most stunning when displayed alongside their peers. They range from a pure white to cream and pink inflected white to a radiant gold.

Tahitian Cultured Pearls are a black based pearl with overtones of pink, blue, gold, green, silver, and reddish purple. They are formed within the pinctada margaritifera, or “black-lipped,” oyster. Although they are cultured today they were harvested recently by free-diving Polynesian fishermen.

Akoya Cultured Pearls come from the world’s smallest pearl- producing oyster, known as the pinctada fucata martensii. The most sought after are white with a pink tinge. They also produce a dark gray-green color.

Freshwater Cultured Pearls are the most affordable. They are produced from different species of freshwater mussel, not by oysters.

Cultured Seed Pearls and very petite pearls. These pearls are the result of an accidental dislocation of a piece of tissue within a mollusk during pearl cultivation.

Mabé Cultured Pearls are the oldest cultured pearl. The Chinese first cultivated it more than 700 years ago. They are unique because they grow within the shell of the oyster, instead of within its soft tissue.

Peridot

With a hardness of 6.5 to 7, Peridot is rated “fair” for everyday wear with care. Avoid exposure to heat and sudden changes in temperature. Avoid contact with chemicals. To clean, gently scrub with a soft toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and warm water.

Peridot color ranges from medium to dark yellowish green, to medium to dark slightly yellowish green.

Quartz

With a hardness of 6.5 to 7, Quartz is rated “good” for everyday wear. Avoid direct sunlight and exposure to heat which may cause color to fade. Avoid contact with chemicals. To clean, gently scrub with a soft toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and warm water, or clean in an at-home ultrasonic unit.

Quartz takes its name from a Greek word meaning “icy cold,” reflecting an early belief that it was a form of super cooled ice.

Green Quartz is a light slightly yellowish green.

Lemon Quartz is a light slightly greenish yellow.

Smoky Quartz has a color that ranges from medium light tan to medium dark brown. It was a staple of Victorian mourning jewelry.

Rutilated Quartz is colorless with eye visible golden rutile needles. Gemstone mythology attributes healing powers to rutilated quartz by helping the wearer find stability and balance in life.

Tourmalinated Quartz is colorless with eye visible black tourmaline needles.

Ruby

With a hardness of 9, Rubies are rated “excellent” for everyday wear. Avoid exposure to heat and contact with chemicals. To clean, gently scrub with a soft toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and warm water, or clean in an at-home ultrasonic unit.

Ruby is the birthstone of July. In large sizes, it is rarer than diamonds. In ancient Rome they were believed to excite passions and guard one’s wealth and rank.

Sapphire

With a harness of 9, Sapphires are rated “excellent” for everyday wear. Avoid exposure to heat and contact with chemicals. To clean, gently scrub with a soft toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and warm water, or clean in an at-home ultrasonic unit.

Sapphire comes in every color of the rainbow except red. It is then known as a ruby.

Blue sapphire is the birthstone for September. In Ancient Rome it was believed to guard one from envy, increase wealth, and protect rulers from harm.

Pink sapphire ranges from light to medium dark pink.

White sapphire is sometimes used as a diamond alternative.

Yellow Sapphire ranges in color from light to medium yellow, and medium to dark yellow. It is thought to bring cheer.

Black Star Sapphire range in color from charcoal gray to dark brown and feature a star look on the top of the stone. The largest known star sapphire is the Black Star of Queensland. It is a 733 carat black and is currently on display in New York at the American Museum of Natural History.

Blue Star Sapphire is a dark blue with patches of white with a star shape on the top. They have been associated with good fortune.

Spinel

With a hardness of 8, Spinel is rated “Excellent” for everyday wear. To clean, gently scrub with a soft toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and warm water.

Black Spinel rivals Onyx. It is one of the rarest spinel. Some believe that it eases a sad heart and promotes positive romantic relationships.

Pink Spinel was commonly confused with both ruby and pink topaz. Many famous historical rubies, were actually spinel. The color is a medium reddish pink.

Tanzanite

With a hardness of 6 to 7, Tanzanite is not for everyday wear, and one should take care when wearing. Avoid exposure to heat and sudden changes in temperature. Avoid contact with chemicals. To clean, gently scrub with a soft toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and warm water.

Color is a light to medium bluish purple and can appear more purplish violet in artificial light.

Topaz

Blue and white topaz is rated “fair to good” for everyday wear with care. Avoid direct sunlight and exposure to heat which may cause color to fade. Avoid contact with chemicals. To clean, gently scrub with a soft toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and warm water.

London Blue Topaz is a deeper, gray blue stone.

Sky Blue Topaz is a bright light blue color. It is sometimes used in place of aquamarine as it rivals it in color and charm and is found in a greater abundance.

Swiss Blue Topaz is a medium to dark bright blue sometimes thought to be a glacier color.

Green Mystic Topaz is a multi-colored stone. It is medium light green with purple and pink hues.

Pure Pink Mystic Topaz is a vibrant medium to medium dark pure pink color.

Sunrise Mystic Topaz has a medium light orange yellow color with tinges of pink, thought to resemble a sunrise.

Tourmaline

With a hardness of 7 to 7.5, Tourmaline is rated “fair to good” for everyday wear with care. Avoid exposure to heat and protect from scratches and harsh blows. To clean, gently scrub with a soft toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and warm water.

Tourmaline is available in a variety of colors but is most desirable in green and pink.

Green tourmaline is a medium to dark yellowish green.

Pink Tourmaline is a birthstone for October. It was highly treasured in China.

Turquoise

With a hardness of 5 to 6, Turquoise is rated “fair” for everyday wear with care. Avoid exposure to heat, contact with chemicals, and protect from scratches and harsh blows. To clean, gently scrub with a soft toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and warm water.

Turquoise is a sacred stone for Native Americans across the southwestern United States as well as Aztecs and ancient Egyptians. It is credited with a variety of magical properties. It was most famously believed to protect the wearer from injuries by falling, particularly from a horse.

Zircon

With a hardness of 7.5, zircon is rated “fair” for everyday wear with care. Avoid direct sunlight and exposure to heat which may cause color to fade. To clean, gently scrub with a soft toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and warm water.

Blue Zircon is the birthstone for December. It is not a cubic zirconia as sometimes thought. It ranges in color from medium to dark slightly greenish blue.

Medieval Europeans believed that zircon promoted restful sleep, wealth and dispelled evil spirits.

Birthstones

 

Anniversary Stones

 

Lab Grown & Chatham Stones

Lab Grown stones are not fake. They have the same physical, chemical, and optical makeup as the natural stone of the same kind.

Lab Grown stones can actually look “better” than that of their naturally found counterparts. This is because under the controlled conditions there is a significantly less chance of foreign items making their way into the stone while being formed.

Chatham is the lead supplier of Lab Grown stones. They explain Lab Grown as followed;

“The process of growing gem crystals in a laboratory rather than mining them is a bit like making ice in your freezer instead of finding it in a lake. You place the starter material, water, in a container, and put the container into a controlled environment: your freezer. Create the right conditions of temperature and time and ice crystals will form. The freezer ice will usually be cleaner and more perfect than lake ice because you can carefully control the environment. But it’s still ice, just like the ice that forms in nature. In a way, what we do is a sophisticated high-tech version of freezing water to form ice.”

Imitation/ Simulated Stones

A simulated stone is a stone that is acting as the stone it is imitating. It does not have the same physical or chemical properties of said natural stone.

Think:

Simulated = Similar

Synthetic= Authentic

Gold

Gold is rust, corrosion, and tarnish resistant. It is an element that is naturally found in a yellow color.

White Gold is commonly made by adding nickel, zinc, or silver to the gold. Even then jewelry that is white gold is extremely likely to have a rhodium plating over it. Rhodium plating is what makes it appear that bright white/silver color.

Rose Gold is made by adding a higher content of copper. Rose Gold most closely resembles copper.

Each of the colors can vary depending on the alloys to achieve the different colors. Because of this you will sometimes see a gold that is more golden than a piece next to it may be.

Platinum

Platinumunlike White Gold, is its white color all the way through, it will not fade or change color. The metal used for platinum is usually 90-95% pure. It is heavier and more expensive than white gold.

It is important to mention that platinum takes on its own look as it is worn. It takes on a look best described as “dings” or scratches, while this can be buffed out, it will continue to wear the same once you begin wearing it again. While some don’t mind it or think it makes it unique, there are many that find it unfavorable.

Palladium 

Palladium is one of the rarest metals and is part of the platinum family. It is silver in color and very resistant to corrosion and oxidation.

Palladium is lighter than platinum. It is also hypoallergenic.

Sterling Silver

Sterling Silver is standard for high quality silver jewelry. Mixed with alloys to add strength and durability, sterling silver is 92.5% pure silver and is sometimes marked on the jewelry piece as .925.

Care should be taken when using chemicals as it can damage the silver. It is also recommended not to wear it in chlorinated water.

Silver will tarnish depending on the environment it is in. Tarnish is removable by bringing your item in to be buffed and polished or by specially formulated cloths/solutions.

Tungsten

Tungsten Carbide is commonly created from an alloy of 80% elemental tungsten and 20% carbon alloyed with other metals, proprietary elements vary.

Tungsten is scratch resistant, but can be shattered if hit just right.

Stainless Steel

Stainless steel is rust and stain resistant, as well as corrosion resistant. It is an alloy of iron and carbon containing 12%+ of chromium.

Copper

Copper is known as a reddish brown color. It is sometimes used as a base metal and coated with another metal like silver. While this may make the piece less expensive, the coated metal will wear off and you will be left with a copper item instead of a silver or gold item.

Copper is sometimes believed to have healing properties, relieve symptoms of arthritis, and help with circulation issues.

Titanium 

Titanium is a dark silver gray color. It is a hard material but is also very light.

Rhodium Plating

Rhodium plating is often used on top of white gold pieces. Rhodium helps protect the item and adds a glossy look. Rhodium is also what make your white gold piece look the very white color that it does. It is sometimes used as an anti-tarnish coating on top of silver.

Rhodium plating will eventually wear off. Your lifestyle will make a large difference in how quickly your item will need to be re-coated.

Rhodium plating is sometimes referred to as dipping.

Micro Pavé

Is a technique of setting small stones usually there are multiple rows and can be used to fill in spaces. These settings are only possible using high magnification.

Micro Pavé set diamonds are held in by microscopic prongs (many of which are around .33 of a millimeter). While this is a beautiful and popular look it can also be very high maintenance.

When we work on or even clean this style of jewelry we plan for at least a few to fall out, which in turn can make the repair more expensive.

Pavé Set

Pavé set is similar to Micro Pavé with the stones and prongs being slightly larger.

While they are a little easier to work with, they still have many of the outcomes and maintenance that a Micro Pavé set style does. Hand set Pavé style is usually more durable.

Channel Set

Channel Set is basically two solid bars that hold the diamonds in between. There are very few problems with this type of setting. Stones can loosen but are usually caught before they are lost.

Prong Set

Prong set is what you most commonly see a center stone set in. These prong are larger than both Micro Pavé and Pavé. Unless one or two prongs are getting low, or the piece is hit against something, there are very few issues with stones falling out.

This is often the ideal setting type to show off and highlight a stone.

Invisible Set & Tension Set

Invisible Set is when there is a channel around the outside of the stones but no prongs holding the multiple rows in. There is usually a very small cut out in each of the stones that link them together. This type of setting can create some beautiful and very unique pieces.

Because tension is what is keeping the stones in place, any sizing or even cleaning can result in the stones falling out in a Tension Set style.

Invisible and tension setting is a job in and around itself and is extremely difficult. There are very few jewelers that work with them. Repairs on these pieces can be very costly.

Hitting an invisible or tension set item against something just right can also make a stone(s) fall out. At times people are completely unaware that they have done anything to cause a stone to fall out.

*We do not guarantee any work on invisible set items. We recommend returning the item to the original vendor.